Rejected or Revise and Resubmit

ImageOn this beautiful Easter Monday morning, my A to Z Blog Challenge blog entry deals with the letter “R”. Every author knows the anguish caused by the dreaded “R” REJECTED! Sometimes, the “R” comes with a reason, more often than not, it doesn’t. The standard line goes something like this: “Publishing is a very subjective business, and while your manuscript isn’t right for us at this time, it may fit another publisher’s line. Good luck finding it a home.” 

That is probably one of the most useless comments an author can receive. If it didn’t suit you, can you tell me why? Writing etiquette says you don’t have the right to email back and ask WHY? It’s annoying and frustrating. Every writer gets rejections, and every writer curses and complains about them and tries to figure out what they could do differently. Some writers will simply send the manuscript off to another publisher, just as it is; a few will revise it before sending it out again, and some will consign the manuscript to the REJECTED folder on their desktop, and never to let it see the light of day again. Truth be told, I have a few manuscripts  in my Rejection folder, but currently four of them are previously published novels consigned there because the publisher closed its doors. They sit there because I don’t know what I’ll do with them. 

But, a rejection isn’t always a rejection. Fire Angel, the first novel I published, was a Revise and Resubmit. I made the changes suggested, and the publisher bought the book. Recently, I’ve received another “R&R”. This time for a historical romance called, The Price of Honor. The editor has made suggestions she’d like me to implement in the novel, and then she wants to see it again. Well, as soon as I finish the edits on my current manuscript, Echoes Of The Past , due to be released July 14, 2014, that’s exactly what I’ll do. The changes she’s suggesting are meant to tighten the story, and while they’ll eliminate a fair chunk of historical detail, it will focus the story more on the plot and the characters. Since I’m detail oriented and some readers aren’t, we’ll see if I can sell the story. One thing is for certain, I will hold on to the original manuscript, rich in detail and description of early Canada and life in the  seventeenth century, and if the “R&R” doesn’t make it, both manuscripts will go into the rejection folder until I pull them out and try again.

Don’t forget to check out the other A to Z Blog Challenge entries for today.

 

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